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Cooking with Hannibal: Kaiseki

Hannibal slices meat in the dream sequence, then catches Jack Crawford's eye.

Hannibal slices meat in the dream sequence, then catches Jack Crawford’s eye.

SPOILER ALERT! Season 2 kicked off on Friday with a Hannibal-on-Jack fight in the kitchen. Turns out, it utilized one of my least favorite narrative devices. The “it was all a dream” schtick. There were a couple of very cool images during the fight scene, though. Before the fight explodes, we see Hannibal prepping meat and a salad and there are some very eerie reflections as we see him slice.

Dream sequence: Hannibal preps salad then sees his own reflection.

Dream sequence: Hannibal preps salad then sees his own reflection.

Back in the real world, Hannibal really does¬†cook dinner for Jack Crawford, supposedly to make him feel better about Will’s apparent guilt. He makes Jack a kaiseki meal (a type of high-end Japanese repast that has imperial roots), including some raw sliced “flounder” and some sea urchin.

Sea Urchin during Kaiseki dinner Hannibal serves to Jack Crawford.

Sea Urchin during Kaiseki dinner Hannibal serves to Jack Crawford.

Doesn’t it look beautiful?

Look how pretty!

Look how pretty!

It’s served with the squid roll (the tall white object below) as a side to the flounder dish, but in my opinion, sea urchin always merits center stage.

Sea Urchin with Squid Roll and Squid Ink Quills

Sea Urchin with Squid Roll and Squid Ink Quills

One of my favorite sea urchin dishes is a Sicilian pasta made with bottarga and fresh sea urchin. Here is a recipe:

Pasta with Bottarga and Sea Urchin (adapted from La Cucina: The Regional Cooking of Italy)

INGREDIENTS

4 ounces bottarga of tuna

2 garlic cloves

1/4 cup finely chopped Italian parsley

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1 pound spaghetti or bucatini

Salt

1/4 cup fresh sea urchin

METHOD

1. Grate the bottarga into a medium mixing bowl. Add the garlic, parsley and olive oil. 

2. Cook the pasta in unsalted boiling water since the bottarga is so salty. When al dente, drain.

3. Add the sea urchin into the pasta, then add the bottarga mixture, mix gently so as not to break up the pieces of sea urchin, and enjoy!

Will's prison food

Will’s prison food

Less alluring by far are the culinary delights of the prison system. Poor Will!

 

About francoiseeats

I'm currently working as a freelance travel and food writer, and photographer. I spent two years at StarChefs.com, the culinary on-line magazine for the industry insider. My articles have been published in New York, NY and Richmond, VA. After graduating from Columbia University and recovering from the tragedy of not being able to read Camus books for a living, I attended The Culinary Institute of America, where my scone consumption rose drastically. Fluent in French and Italian, I've worked in some of New York's top restaurants and covered food-related stories in a number of publications, from The Richmond Times-Dispatch to Time Out New York.

2 responses »

  1. Hi

    Just found your blog. Fascinating and beautiful. Do you happen to know what is the brand of the knives Hannibal uses in his kitchen scenes?

    Reply
    • Thanks for reading! I was curious too, since the style is unusual…I haven’t been able to make out the brand name on the knives. They don’t look like the signature style of Wusthof or Global. That’s about all I could tell.

      Reply

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