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Popsicle Watch: Grown Up Popsicles

Popbar’s Chocolate-Coated Banana Popsicle Photo Credit: Village Voice

Flip-flop-meltingly hot New York summers call for frozen relief. Luckily for me, Big Gay Ice Cream Truck with its dulce de leche adorned goodies is steps away from work. The adult-friendly condiments, like wasabi peas, and key lime curd, got me thinking, though. Whatever happened to those grown up popsicles everyone was talking about? Lunapops especially was everywhere in the press, for its Mexican paleta-based popsicles in grown-up flavors like Pomegranate Blueberry and Pineapple Ginger Wasabi. Big Gay Ice Cream Truck’s success is in part, I think, due to the fact that they took ordinary soft serve and gussied it up with sophisticated flavors, without ruining the childlike appeal of a summer ice cream treat. Why is it, then, that some enterprising popsicle salesman hasn’t cornered the market on this one? A Charlottesville-based friend have told me about Pantheon Popsicles, with tantalizing chunks of fruit in most bars. The fact that she’s about 8 months pregnant gives one of the few allowed treats an extra allure. Hibiscus popsicle anyone? I’ve personally never been to Popbar but seriously, how gorgeous do all the different flavors of popsicle look behind the glass? Kind of wish that popsicle renaissance had caught on. For the moment it seems to be confined to the summer months. I’ll be trying out recipes in my popsicle molds all summer. Some that look pretty promising: Rhubarb, Minted Watermelon, and Pichet Ong’s Avocado Chili. Jury’s still out on whether cocktail popsicles are horrific, or a godsend when it comes to summer. Watch this space!

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About francoiseeats

I'm currently working as a freelance travel and food writer, and photographer. I spent two years at StarChefs.com, the culinary on-line magazine for the industry insider. My articles have been published in New York, NY and Richmond, VA. After graduating from Columbia University and recovering from the tragedy of not being able to read Camus books for a living, I attended The Culinary Institute of America, where my scone consumption rose drastically. Fluent in French and Italian, I've worked in some of New York's top restaurants and covered food-related stories in a number of publications, from The Richmond Times-Dispatch to Time Out New York.

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