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Cooking with Hannibal: Futamono

 

Overview of Hannibal's party Hors d'Oeuvres

Overview of Hannibal’s party Hors d’Oeuvres

If Jack’s team is right, Hannibal finally made some food that contains animals rather than people. For a party, he prepares a variety of goodies with the help of the lovely Dr. Bloom.

More of Hannibal's party Hors d'Oeuvres

More of Hannibal’s party Hors d’Oeuvres

In the above photo, you can see little Wagyu Beef Roulade slices (stuffed with Sushi Rice) all decked out with chive flowers on the left. On the right, are little Filo Pastry Flowers with Beef Heart Tartare. In the middle you can see some of the Prosciutto Roses on Watermelon. For more on Hannibal’s party menu, click here.

Wagyu Beef

Wagyu Beef

Beef Roulade

Wagyu Beef Roulade stuffed with Sushi Rice before cooking

Beef Kebabs

Beef Kebabs

Beef Heart Tartare in Filo Pastry

Beef Heart Tartare in Filo Pastry

Prosciutto Rose on Watermelon

Prosciutto Rose on Watermelon

 

Platter of Prosciutto Roses on Watermelon

Platter of Prosciutto Roses on Watermelon

If you’d like to try some offal hors d’oeuvres, here is a recipe I developed for The Ration Diaries. Since a lot of whole birds come with the offal in the cavity, I try and use it up with little bites like this. If you want to make something like this in mass, you can always buy veal heart and cut it much more finely; you still need to be careful too cook it gently since it’s a tough muscle and when cooked over a high heat, it tends to get REALLY tough.

Bacon confited-Guinea Fowl Heart with Brussels Sprouts and Blackcurrant Preserves

Bacon confited-Guinea Fowl Heart with Brussels Sprouts and Blackcurrant Preserves

Bacon confited-Guinea Fowl Heart with Brussels Sprouts and Blackcurrant Preserves (from The Ration Diaries)

Servings: 1

INGREDIENTS
1/4 strip bacon
1 Guinea Fowl heart
1/2 Brussels sprout, cut in half
Salt
1 tablespoon vegetable broth
1 demitasse spoonful blackcurrant preserves

METHOD
Slice the bacon very thinly then render it in a non-stick pan. When the bacon is crispy, use a slotted spoon to remove it to a plate. Pour the bacon into a boiled egg cup. Allow the bacon fat to cool slightly, then add the heart. Put the egg cup in the microwave and set to “keep warm” for 2 to 5 minutes, or until the heart is cooked through. Heart gets tough very easily, so it’s important not to cook the heart on high. Sear the cut sides of the Brussels sprout quarters in the hot pan, and season with salt. Add the vegetable broth and simmer until the broth has evaporated. Slice the heart very thinly and reserve the bacon fat for another use. Serve the heart garnished with Brussels sprouts, reserved bacon, and blackcurrant preserves.

 

Cooking with Hannibal: Mukozuke

Hannibal opening oysters

Hannibal opening oysters

Finally, more food! The past 2 episodes have been a bit of a respite from the cooking on the show, but this episode, Hannibal’s back in the kitchen. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day; to Hannibal, this means pancetta, oysters, crayfish and other fancy fancies with his eggs, as he whips up a little something for Jack to comfort him in his time of need…or mess with his mind.

Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled Eggs

This is juxtaposed with a rather beige, depressing-looking breakfast for Will at the Baltimore loony bin. Then we get a flash of pancetta porn from Hannibal’s breakfast:

Pancetta sizzling for Hannibal's breakfast

Pancetta sizzling for Hannibal’s breakfast

And a gorgeous shot of a crayfish and oyster platter. The beetles were a total turn-off for me; who wants to see beetles at breakfast? Now dinner…

Crayfish, Oysters and Beetles

Crayfish, Oysters and Beetles

Here’s the final dish: eggs, pancetta, crayfish and oyster.

Pancetta, eggs, crayfish and oyster

Hannibal’s Breakfast: Pancetta, eggs, crayfish and oyster

Will's Hospital Breakfast

Will’s Hospital Breakfast

The above is one of the beige-est meals I’ve ever seen.

Will's Sad Face

Will’s Sad Face (hospital breakfasts get him down)

No wonder Will looks sad.

My favorite breakfast egg recipe ever is a mascarpone and tomato frittata that I used to make while working at an Italian restaurant. It used oven-dried tomatoes, but I’ve replaced it with some sundried tomatoes and some roasted, since the oven-dried ones take forever to make.

Mascarpone and Tomato Frittata with Basil

Yield: about 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

olive oil

3 ripe roma tomatoes, halved

5 sprigs thyme

Salt and pepper

2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil, drained

5 eggs, preferably local farm eggs

1 cup mascarpone

1/2 bunch fresh basil, torn

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Drizzle a small, ovenproof baking dish with some olive oil. Put the roma tomatoes in it, cut face up. Add the thyme sprigs, season with salt and pepper and dust with the sugar. Put the tomatoes in the oven to roast (about 30 minutes, or until browning and emitting an incredible, slightly sweet aroma). Meanwhile, make sure the sun-dried tomatoes are drained and mince (they can be pretty chewy, so you want to make sure they’re cut fairly small. Whisk the eggs together in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Prepare a large, cast-iron skillet by heating over a medium heat. When the roma tomatoes are roasted, remove them from the oven and using a slotted spoon, remove them to a chopping board and cut roughly. Keep the oven on, since you’ll finish the frittata in it. You can reserve the olive oil and roasting juices for a vinaigrette, if you’d like-you just need some vinegar. Turn the heat to high under the cast iron skillet, then add olive oil. Heat until it shimmers a bit, then add the whisked eggs. Using a heatproof spatula, push around the eggs until curds start to form, then allow to solidify a bit before scooping spoonfuls of the mascarpone onto the top of the eggs, being careful to distribute evenly. Add the tomatoes and sun-dried tomatoes. DO NOT STIR!!! Put the skillet in the oven. When the frittata is puffy, and appears fully cooked, about 15 minutes, remove from the oven. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Cut in the skillet, then top with the basil. You can serve from the skillet at the table. And yes, it goes beautifully with pancetta. From a pig. Not the Hannibal kind.

Cooking with Hannibal: Rôti

Kudal: a South Indian Curry with a Coconut, Coriander and Chili Sauce

Kudal: a South Indian Curry with a Coconut, Coriander and Chili Sauce

So, we haven’t seen all that much in the way of obvious Indian culinary influence on the show yet. This episode, Hannibal serves Dr. Chilton Kudal, which he describes as a “South Indian Curry with a coconut, coriander and chili sauce.” We can see a bit more clearly what else is on the plate besides the bowl of curry on the fabulous blog of Janice Poon, whose blog Feeding Hannibal details some of her amazing food styling work on the show.

Sketch by Janice Poon of food styling for Kudal on Hannibal

Sketch by Janice Poon of food styling for Kudal on Hannibal

There’s a banana leaf plate. The Kudal, which according to the sketch includes plantains, is in a banana leaf bowl. Also on the plate are some purple yam chips, some Pani Puri balls filled with pomegranate and yogurt, and a rice pilaf. There are also some feathers, berries, moss and chrysanthemum for decoration.

Pani Puri is actually something I wasn’t familiar with until I looked it up and found out it is the Hindi word for Golgappa, a street food/appetizer popular in many areas of India and known by different names depending on where you are in India. Golgappa are little balls of dough that are usually stuffed with a flavoring of some kind. The few I’ve had have usually been stuffed with a tamarind vegetable mixture. In her book Modern Spice, DC-based writer Monica Bhide describes meeting one of her idols, Chef Sanjeev Kapur, and eating some Golgappas with him, stuffed with shrimp, served sitting on top of shot glasses of lavender coconut curry.  She suggests serving store-bought Golgappas filled with mashed potatoes and cilantro on Chinese soup spoons, and eating them while drinking shots of flavored vodka. Here is an adapted version of her recipe from the book, from Leite’s Culinaria. Here, she just describes serving a shot of spiced, chilled buttermilk soup with a stuffed Golgappa balanced on top of the shot glass. I love her Kapur-inspired appetizer idea, since it will finally give me a use for those shot glasses I haven’t pulled out of the back of the cupboard since college. Cheers!

Golgappas stuffed with shrimp, from Monica Bhide, via Leite's Culinaria. Photo by Leite's Culinaria.

Golgappas stuffed with shrimp, from Monica Bhide’s Modern Spice, via Leite’s Culinaria. Photo by Leite’s Culinaria.

Hot Shots

Recipe adapted from Monica Bhide’s Modern Spice, via Leite’s Culinaria

INGREDIENTS

For the filling:

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon mustard seeds

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon red chile flakes

1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 pound shrimp, peeled, deveined, and diced

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Salt

For the soup:

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1/2 teaspoon black mustard seeds

1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds

1/8 teaspoon fenugreek seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

2 cups buttermilk

1 clove garlic 

1/8 teaspoon ground turmeric

1/4 teaspoon salt

20 large, store-bought golgappas

METHOD
 
For the filling:
In a skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. When the oil begins to shimmer add the mustard seeds. As the seeds begin to sizzle, add the garlic. Saute for a few seconds, until the garlic begins to change color. Add the chile flakes, turmeric, and shrimp, and cook for 2 minutes, or just until the shrimp are no longer translucent. Do not overcook the shrimp or they will become rubbery. Add the lemon juice and salt to taste. Mix well, remove from the heat, and set aside.
For the soup:
In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, heat the oil until it shimmers and then add the mustard, cumin, and fenugreek seeds, and the curry leaves. Cook, stirring frequently, for a few seconds, until the seeds begin to splutter. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature. Pour the buttermilk into a blender. Add the spice mixture, garlic, turmeric, and salt. Blend until the mixture is fairly smooth. There will be a few tiny pieces of curry leaves—this is fine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or until cold. Pour 2 tablespoons of the soup into each shot glass. Fill each golgappa with about 2 teaspoons of the filling. Place a golgappa on top of a shot glass and serve.

Cooking with Hannibal: Ceuf

Image

Modified “Rabbit” Boudin Noir from Gastronomie Pratique by Ali-Bab aka Henri Babinksi

No animals (or humans) were harmed during the filming of episode 3 of Hannibal, Potage…not for deliciousness’ sake anyway. So I’ve moved right along to episode 4, Ceuf.

Apparently Hannibal is an avid food historian. My inner food historian geek rejoiced! How do we know? When he shows off his modified “Rabbit” Boudin Noir (a traditional French blood sausage), he mentions that he got the recipe from Gastronomie Pratique by Ali-Bab. Ali-Bab was the pen name of Henri Babinski, a French cookbook author who published this particular book in 1907. While I don’t happen to have a copy, you can find boudin noir recipes in any classic French cookbook. Or if you’re glued to the online recipe, CLICK HERE for a recipe from The New York Times. The one he serves doesn’t look like it’s accompanied by the traditional apples and potatoes, but by some sort of mystery cylinder. Knowing Hannibal, best not to ask what’s in it.

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